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Interview with Laura Thorne

I had the pleasure of an interview with Laura Thorne of Laura Thorne Consulting and Laura Thorne Photography today, and have the recording and transcript to prove it. Listen for tips from Laura about succeeding in business, art and life, or find out what my not-guilty pleasure during COVID quarantine has been.

Learn more about Laura Thorne’s business consulting and coaching services at laurathorneconsulting.com and about her photography at laurathornephotography.com.

 

Part 1 Transcript

Emily Longbrake
All right, I’m here with the lovely Laura Thorne, and and just wanted to start off our interview with a question about your playlist for today. I was watching your interview with Bryan Voliton on Unmanageables, and you said that music really drives how you’re feeling and how you work.

Laura Thorne
Yes, it absolutely does. And I find myself not turning it on enough. And a lot of times I will turn it on in the morning and then I’ll get a call or you know, like sometimes you take a picture of something and it stops and then like three hours later, I’m like, why is it so quiet? And be when I were also talking about how can we make work more enjoyable and that I think is one of the easy ways is just to put some music on. But yeah, music has fueled me through my entire life. And so some days I feel the need to put on what I call my AM station on Pandora. And that’s a lot of 80s and 90s, maybe kind of like Richard Marks. And Christopher Cross Sailing and Lionel Richie and stuff like that. So things I can listen to because I’ve heard them 10,000 times, so it doesn’t distract me from from working. But then other times if like, I’ve been having a challenging day, or I’ve been feeling challenged in particular, then depending if it’s sort of rebellious challenge that I’m listening to punk rock, and if it’s sort of like, I need motivation that is hip hop. Yeah, so today, I think I started with AM because it’s just been rainy here for days.

Emily Longbrake
Wow. That sounds about right. I’d say the same as well. We’re lucky to have so many options, like having some DJ working in the background all day for us.

Laura Thorne
A lot of times, I’ll just put on my instrumentals. And that’s just like, I think my station is called “All the Feels But No Words,” like movie soundtracks.

Emily Longbrake
Also on your website, I saw that we’re both INTJ personality types. I was just curious if kind of doing those fun quizzes and then learning those things about yourself has changed anything in particular for you, or as far as finding better ways to work that work in the long run. Not just more productive for a day or two.

Laura Thorne
Yeah, so I both take stock in those and I don’t so they’re a little bit like horoscopes right, which are fluffy to me. I think depending on your perspective, any horoscope if someone told you it was yours, you could find something out of it that you can relate to yourself. But at the same time, I’m also an Aquarius, and I feel like that fits me very well. But, INTJ for people who don’t know what that is, is from the Myers Briggs personality assessment. And it’s a long standing one. I’ve taken it through 16 personalities, which is a free one online that I really like, because that’s fun little cartoons and tells you who your famous people you also share that with. The INTJ women are less than like 2% of the population. And we’re architects: it totally fits me because I tear things apart and put them back together always. People, stories, the news, stuff I’m working on, things I learned. I criticize the hell of it pulled apart and then put it back together. And even even in my photography, I think that I’m always looking for the pieces and how things fit together, whether it’s light and texture or different textures or colors, like I’m still an architect in my photography. I think so. I think really, it’s if it has any purpose for me, it just gives me a little bit more competence or validation that this is a valid personality type and this is mine.

Emily Longbrake
I also saw that I was curious about taking your art on the road, thinking of taking things apart, like your whole life all of a sudden, when, that just has to happen. When you were on your long RV trip, how did you find ways to make taking pictures and keeping that part of your life in this tiny space?

Laura Thorne
Yeah, so that was an exceptionally wonderful time in my life. I mean, it was following a particularly difficult time but it was much needed and time of reflection and just like getting my my mojo and my self esteem back and confidence and so driving a rust bucket across the country is a great way to do that. I wish I had done more photography at that time, but I was kind of in between. So one of the things that I reflected on after I’d worked in government for 10 years right before I went on that road trip was that I didn’t hold on to art enough. So when I was younger, I used to play cello and I used to do all kinds of art, not just photography, but photography was my love because I don’t have patience for the process of regular art, fine arts and so, kind of when things switched to digital, I didn’t you know, I hesitated on really making that shift. I love the darkroom. So I didn’t there was a long period of time where the photography I took was, um, you know, I work in the environment. So I still was outdoors and and really learning that was a great opportunity to just to learn what I see what you see out there. So I think it builds on my photography. But when I went on that road trip, I can’t even remember what I was using for a camera. But I did get to just film. I went from Tampa to Yosemite, California, so the scenery was endless and ever changing. But I really what I did do during that time (so now you’re making me think) was start my Instagram. So that was really the launch of me getting back into photography. I decided I wanted to have a thing, you know, and so and when I quit that job, I decided I was going to do photography, business consulting and career coaching and then just see which one I liked which one took off, you know, the diversification strategy. And so of course, I like all of them. It’s been really hard to keep all of them going. But you know, I kind of vowed to keep art in my life. So that’s kind of when the photography or the my Instagram page started, and I had a lot of time. So I was fortunate to kind of catch that window when you could still get followers on Instagram. easier now then you might be able to starting a page today and kind of get a really good base following. So now the struggle is keeping it going. And so yeah, I didn’t I didn’t really capitalize on photography in the way that I could have been like an Ansel Adams National Park kind of sense. But I really did kind of bring it reintroduce it back into the forefront in my life. And if I did that trip again, it would be it would be *on*, because the Instagram page is already up and going. And I did also incorporate it into a story map which had GIS so it mapped out all the places I went incorporated with a blog and so the photography was was part of that story.

Emily Longbrake
It sounds likemaybe you end up coaching people through those kinds of transitions. Anyway, like photography was important, but healing and deciding where you’re going to go next was also the biggest part that you needed to do at that time.

Laura Thorne
Yeah.

Emily Longbrake
And not dwell on it too much, but the experiences you had before that trip sounded like they were really impactful: I was just curious how those experiences helped you coach people through those kind of parts of their life. Working with all different ages, in artist communities, and even manufacturing businesses, people always have things going on. Is there anything from from that time that has helped you help other people?

Laura Thorne
Oh, absolutely. So I’m not a people person per se, which which surprises people because I do well with people but I’m more of an environmental and animals advocate. I leave the bleeding heart stuff to the bleeding hearts, but I really really like helping people who want to achieve, achieve. And so a lot of times I surprise my own self because I’ll meet someone who I think is going to drive me nuts and then I love them to death and I try to help them to make things happen whether it’s art business, regular business, or just life. I do a lot of mentoring. I really love working with people who are kind of in the college about to graduate or recently graduated space who just don’t feel like they’re ready for anything. Because I have been through a lot and I still feel like a kid, I think that it’s easy for for younger people to have a conversation with me and also I I don’t wear kind of the the facade that a lot of professional leaders wear that, you know, I’m something and you can’t approach me. I’m still the girl next door and I will tell you about life and what’s real and what’s not. And, of course there’s people that like that and some people who don’t, but that’s one of the things you deal with in those situations is like who are you and owning and being proud of who you are and just like finding people who appreciate that instead of worrying about the ones who don’t. I did a talk recently for a university online my alumni at USF (go Bulls) and they just today sent me some feedback. I guess they had the students write up about like, what they learned or what they really liked. And there were some really good comments in there about just just sharing my story, I think just helps people.

Emily Longbrake
Yeah, and speaking of writing, your writing on your websites awesome. I am envious of your writing skills. As a visual learner, I feel like writing is a secondary part that comes in, like you’re an artist first and then you learn to write. Is writing something something you coach right now?

Laura Thorne
I’ve always done both. I wrote a book when I was 18. I wrote poetry. I have a whole suitcase full of writings and poetry that I did. So all all the hemispheres of my brain, just like are always going. So I’m glad that you said that though. Because I kind of feel like I don’t. I read all kinds of awkward and weird to me. So thank you for that comment. But actually, before when I were just talking about that, like things that we wanted to improve, so maybe I’ll just leave that alone. But no, I don’t really help people. Well, I don’t know I do. I do work with artists on telling their stories. I think and I have another client who really speaks high level you know, and I’m like Okay, we got to bring this down.

Emily Longbrake
Yeah, looking for that balance of technical knowledge and both an expression of your story and making something that’s easy to physically read.

Laura Thorne
Yeah, I will say Grammarly helps. If anyone doesn’t know what that is, there’s an app browser download you can get in Grammarly everything. Spelling is definitely not my forte.

Emily Longbrake
Some of the other interviews also had A list of pro tips for people to think about. You have tons of pro tips on your website and worksheets and all kinds of things we could all do.

Laura Thorne
I’d say Grammerly. And Canva I think any anybody who’s not familiar, doesn’t want to spend the money, doesn’t have the time to learn to use Illustrator or Photoshop, likes Canva. It’s my best friend. I can use those other tools, but I can do things so much faster in Canva, because I’m not trying to, you know, there’s a level I need to achieve that is here, not here. And Canva works brilliantly for me and for many other people.

Emily Longbrake
I recommend it to people to for graphic design too.

Laura Thorne
Kind of like graphic design for dummies, isn’t it?

Emily Longbrake
Part of what you do, too, is saying like, Look, there’s people out here who have done the work, you can capitalize on the work that’s already there and use it for your own purpose.

Emily Longbrake
So this was the last question I had: I was wondering about how you got involved with the Creators Lounge as a physical space, versus this digital one.

Laura Thorne
That is a wonderful question. So the Creators Lounge is located here in Syracuse on the south side and I live kind of beyond the south side in what’s called the valley. Diversity and inclusion has always been really important to me. And not only is the Creators Lounge sort of in my neighborhood, but it also serves a huge need here in Syracuse. So, and the woman who’s running it, Indaria Jones, she’s young. When I see when I see entrepreneurs and go getters like Indaria, it makes me on the inside just like my inner 20 something year old just super jealous because I’m like, had if I had the the tools, the knowledge the resources to do what she’s got the confidence and ability and just willingness to try is like God what could I have done? But that again is like why I choose to spend time helping people with those areas. But she’s just inspiring. So part of it was just like wanting to show support and the other part is a little bit like community support, doing my part for diversity, equity, inclusion, and then just like hanging out with cool people like the lounges. I’m getting old, I like to hang out with cool people.

Emily Longbrake
Sounds like a good fit!

Laura Thorne
There’s cool music when you go in there. Oh, yeah, young hip. Not my AM station with Lionel Richie on it.

Emily Longbrake
Oh, that’s great. That sounds like a really excellent resource. So ahead of their time, and as far as taking advantage of our technology and still having that real world connection.

Laura Thorne
Yeah, they’re they’re really cool. Like, I’m excited to see what kind of stuff they do in the future, especially when people can lounge there again,

Emily Longbrake
I think we all look forward to lounge together!

Laura Thorne
Thank you so much for taking the time to interview me and asking these questions. I like to see what you take notice of like when you looked at my stuff, so that’s cool.

Emily Longbrake
Sure! In freakanomics they always ask at the end of the interview, what’s one thing about you that most people don’t know? And I was wondering if you had one of those?

Laura Thorne
Hmm. Well, I’m a blabber, I tell people everything they can know about me. I guess I just I’m just gonna say this one because maybe people don’t know, but I want people to know like, I’ve been a vegetarian since I was 20 years old. And I want people to know that because I’m 43 years old. So I like to encourage people to also have a vegetarian diet because it’s good. For the planet, and it’s good for your face.

Emily Longbrake
It shows, right? Have you expanded your vegetarian cuisine since we’ve been in quarantine?

Laura Thorne
Yes, I actually joined one of my clients’ detox diets. So it’s a 21 day detox, but it’s a month to month program. So after the detox, you can go back to eating some of the things you’ve eliminated from your diet, like caffeine, or eggs or dairy. But I already discovered that caffeine is not coming back to me because I had this fog that I thought was from spending so much time on the screen, but it wasn’t: it was from caffeine. I cut it out, and like three days later, I had a super bad headache, and then everything just cleared. I was like, oh my gosh. There’s been some other health benefits that are a little graphic. So I’m not going to talk about them, but they’re like, wow, this is for real. So that and I’ve been trying to get a little bit more vegan eating anyway, because the reason I became vegetarian was animal rights. So I felt a little bit like a hypocrite eating cheese. So I will still eat pizza. That’s not going away. But I’m gonna be vegan minus pizza, you know?

Emily Longbrake
Yeah, we call it “smidgetarian”!

Laura Thorne
Yeah, that’ll be me. I’ve been doing a lot more cooking during quarantine

Emily Longbrake
Food definitely helps feed, your art practice and your business acumen.

Laura Thorne
Thanks again for your time.

Emily Longbrake
Thank you so much!

 

Part 2 Transcript

Laura Thorne
Hi, Emily. Thank you for joining me today for a quick interview. I’m super excited to talk to you and learn more about you. I love your designs. I was looking at your website and you have some really cool and different things. So I have a lot of questions for you around that. But the first thing I wanted to ask you was more about something that I’m sure people are interested in is like, what was it like you were born in Alaska? I was you know, I was not born in Florida, but back then. It was rare for someone to be born in Florida, so it was always like, Oh, what’s that like, but Alaska is even more rare. So what was that like living and growing up in Alaska?

Emily Longbrake
You know, it’s it’s probably just like you’d imagine. Anchorage is a pretty big city. So anyone who’s come on a cruise up here can tell you it’s it’s really ugly city but the mountains surrounding are beautiful and you have a lot of peer pressure to go out and enjoy it because there aren’t a lot of other big city amenities. Yeah, I think just from a young age being outside in the snow and having summers where you can stay up all night, because it’s light out all the time were pretty amazing. I know a lot of kids that were born here to move out of state because it just doesn’t suit them. I’ve traveled around a lot but always come back because it feels like home, and I miss all the idiosyncrasies of Alaskans, like how friendly we are and excited when people come to visit us. Plus, my family’s here.

Laura Thorne
That’s awesome. So I was in Alaska in August. So next time I visit I’ll I’ll have another friend there.

Emily Longbrake
For Alaskans and artists, we say that if you email me in 10 years, and we haven’t not spoken until then, you are welcome to come and stay at our house. We’ll cook halibut and salmon for you, give you some moose burgers. Or some delicious berries and all that good stuff.

Laura Thorne
Awesome. So do you feel like growing up in Alaska has influenced your work? I mean, I don’t know how it couldn’t. But the influence you have you said you’ve traveled though, too. So is there influence of Alaska that shows in your work?

Laura Thorne
Yeah. most of my artwork is definitely based on landscape. And pattern is also something I’ve been really drawn to. I’m not sure if it’s just the the repeating patterns of glaciers and valleys and mountains, or just the minutiae of nature that kids are obsessed with has just stuck forever. So anywhere I’ve traveled and lived, I seek out places that are like Alaska that are that have empty spaces and wilderness or plant and animal diversity and things like that. So yeah, it follows you everywhere you go.

Laura Thorne
That’s it. Interesting. I know, when I travel, I try to get kind of like the opposite of what I’ve been used to.

Unknown Speaker
Yeah, I did live in Phoenix while my husband was going to grad school. And that is definitely the farthest away from our home environment that we’ve lived. And it was pretty amazing to realize that if you’re used to extremes, like extreme cold or extreme heat, you can probably do well in either one. But if you’re an indoor kitty, that’s also something you can probably do.

Laura Thorne
True, if you can adapt, you can just adapt anywhere.

Laura Thorne
So let me see what’s your favorite? Actually, I was gonna say the Phoenix though I feel like and Alaska, they all look as different as they are. The artwork is almost kind of like a little bit similar.

Emily Longbrake
I think maybe like the limited number of things will grow in either place was definitely similar. The Desert Botanical Garden in Phoenix was one of my favorite places to go visit. They have plants from all over the world. So I got to see the plants that I lived with in South Africa when I was an exchange student and just stare for hours at all the cacti all the time, which is, is pretty similar to up here and in a lot of ways.

Laura Thorne
Cool. That’s neat. So let’s talk about that. What was your school experience like? And you said, you went to South Africa?

Emily Longbrake
Yeah, if anybody doesn’t know about it, Rotary International, which you may see around your town, having sponsored lots of business related programs and also community building, and has a International Youth Exchange Program. And so for usually your junior or senior year of high school, you can go abroad for a whole year, and you stay with maybe three to five families during the year. So it’s not a one to one exchange, so you’re not just directly swapping with another teenager. You’re just going somewhere. So yeah, I got picked to go to South Africa. It was not one of my top choices. But I really had lucked out with some amazing host families. And I only had to go to 100 days of school for my whole junior year of high school. So the rest of the time was out traveling, seeing big animals, and getting to see the whole country. So that was pretty amazing. From there, I decided I want to go to medical school, so my undergrad degree is in human physiology with pre med and chemistry. I did a lot of training to see what it was like to become a doctor, and every single person that I worked with talked me out of it. I’m not sure if they’re responding to something in me, because they just realized it wasn’t going to be a good fit or if I realized it was not gonna be a good fit. So I have taken that understanding of the human body and environmental physiology, which is all about how we interact with the environment, and taken a lot of time in between there and now to go travel and live different places like Montana and Phoenix and Central America and then a lot of like, self education. Online classes and a few like post bac classes in art and design and then started working for small businesses. So, my education has been some official and lots of unofficial.

Laura Thorne
Awesome, learning never stops, you know? So during the travel and the different changes in your let’s just say coursework, when did you start picking up like graphic design and art and making that your thing.

Laura Thorne
When I started working for my dad on the family farm during College, and I realized, hey, I can design a flyer that you can read and hey, I can make a sign using really basic tools like Microsoft Word. But it’s really just something I enjoyed. So I kept doing it and kept finding reasons to do it. And I always made art on the side. So if I had a bad day, I’d go home and make a whole book of collages or bust out the crazy paints and trash my garage with old plywood and paint. I had a really awesome photography teacher in high school: he really taught the basics of graphic design. So the foundations were there, and I definitely taken the slow road. But yeah, I think working for a couple other small businesses, I realized that this is not something that everyone enjoys or prefers or is good at doing. It was always something I could kind of take off their plate, and then I just have been lucky to find clients that would hire me as an unexperienced person so that I could build some skills and grow.

Laura Thorne
Awesome. So your clients are they like all over the US are mostly in Alaska.

Emily Longbrake
Alaska right now but yeah, so lucky to have some clients from all the places I’ve traveled and referrals from other other folks too. So those are always welcome. I really enjoy getting to work with people that I have kind of connection with. Many clients are either in agriculture like farms or even a beautiful peony farm in Wasilla. I also really enjoy working with people with technology or like technical backgrounds like IT support because I feel like I can translate for them sometimes, which is hard. I totally understand that. Even having studied physiology, you’re learning a new language and it’s hard to go backward and talk to someone who doesn’t know anything about it in a way that makes sense. I feel like there’s a lot of text and graphic design that helps you so it doesn’t have to all be translating directly. Giving people the visual look and feel that will help them with their message. I just I really enjoy working with small businesses. They’re all different: a candle maker, herbalist and midwife, coffin maker, IT company; those are all they’re so interesting and different and I never get bored.

Laura Thorne
Yeah, that’s great. And then you also do like fine art, right?

Emily Longbrake
Yeah. While my husband was in grad school, I got to work in a really awesome maker space, a little bit different than the Creators Lounge, but similar in that it was just a great group of people. I took one class there and they decided that I should be an instructor on their on their long arm quilter, which was twelve feet long with a very powerful industrial sewing machine attached! From them taking a chance on me teaching I got to learn how to use all kinds of different equipment and work with a lot of other grad students in their program at Arizona State University. So I purchased a laser when I got home and can use all kinds of CNC equipment and have been kind of finding ways to bring them together in an artwork, like making ceramic work by hand and then combining it with something that’s laser cut or coming up with some weird formula for how a book can go together. And then, like doing the physical action of sewing that pattern. I really enjoy what some call algorithmic craft, which sounds very technical, but basically just means coming up with a protocol for what you’re doing that you can repeat or iterate on that will generate new ideas or new physical objects for you.

Laura Thorne
Cool, that’s definitely different. So on your website, you have a blog and then also something called Today Is?

Emily Longbrake
Yep!

Laura Thorne
Are you also a writer?

Emily Longbrake
No, actually when I moved to Phoenix, I didn’t have a job, didn’t have studio, and didn’t have any friends. I needed something to motivate me to keep going every day to generate new ideas, so I did a 365 day blog project. Every day I made something physical or did a digital art project to build my skills in Illustrator and InDesign and Photoshop. Sometimes I’d just run out of ideas that day, so I use a random word generator to come up with a prompt, like a lot of writers would use a prompt and just make random things. So it’s been a surprisingly deep like cache of ideas to draw from. If a client needs a fancy official seal, I can say, hey, I learned how to do that in Illustrator. Let me just grab those files and send them on over! The blog is highly recommended if someone has a lull where they can dedicate some time to it. Like you said, with you starting your Instagram, you really just need that concentrated amount of time and the mental space to work through it.

Laura Thorne
Cool. Yeah. Gosh, you’re so creative. You think all artists are creative, but they’re not. They’re not all creative. Sometimes it’s like a, you know, repeat of the same thing. It’s really it’s, it’s cool to see.

Laura Thorne
You know, with them, it depends on what everyone’s goals are. I’ve been exposed to the graduate art program while my husband was in it at ASU, and I basically took like a vicarious three years to learn as much as I could from all of them. And everybody was making weird stuff every day, but never apologizing for it. Sometimes it worked, and sometimes it didn’t. But it was definitely great to see the professors push the students and just maybe past where they are eventually going to be, like, way out there. And then come back to something that was truly interesting that they could work on as a body of work for many years. It was a pretty inspiring environment for sure.

Laura Thorne
So what’s your favorite thing to work with?

Emily Longbrake
I really don’t have one. I don’t want to put us in the same category, but maybe like you, I think I’ll probably always be somebody that will enjoy switching back and forth and going from digital to problem solving for clients to physical artwork. Yeah, the ceramic studio is really hard on your body. And then digital part can be really hard on your brain and your eyes. Helping businesses with their challenges can be really hard on your little artistic heart. But they support each other too. So, yeah, I would hope that maybe I’ll end up with this awesome swirl of all three of them.

Laura Thorne
That’s great. I do feel like that. It’s just, if every day was the same for me, I’d be bored to tears. So quarantine. At least the work that I’m doing every day is not the same. The routine of it is a little bit… but let’s see, a few more questions. You have a new baby in your house. You’ve adopted which I think is awesome. I don’t know what the reason is or if you care to share, but I think that’s awesome. I’ve always, even since I was in high school, I have a journal entry for one of my classes. I talked about overpopulation. And I was never having kids. And I was, you know, if I ever wanted them I would adopted I have felt that way ever since. And so I think it’s a noble thing to do. And anyway, how’s that changed your life? How you approach your work?

Emily Longbrake
In every way, I’m sure, and there’s ways I’m sure it’s changing right now that I don’t even realize! I’m happy to share: my husband and I couldn’t have kids. So we decided adoption was going to be our best route. I have much respect for people with biological kids, stepkids, or just kids in their life. They say that you can be a parent or a parent figure to any child in your life. So it doesn’t have to be your your very own. My husband’s also the oldest of four adopted kids, and they all had major issues, like health issues or psych issues, when they were adopted. His parents, they’re role models, and gold star parents. We’re hoping to just carry that on to next generation. It’s been a long road. And I definitely advise anybody that’s seeking adoption to look into it and connect with people so you have the support you need while you’re going through it. I actually did a show a few years ago, that was organized by an amazing female artist and she had us all make a piece about our mother: talk about a tough subject! Everyone has a story to tell about their mother or the mother figure in their life or being a mother to someone else. So I think I’m going to continue that body of work, which had been kind of a dead end until now. It was such a difficult prompt at first: how would you make a photograph, one photograph that encapsulated your relationship with your mom, especially coming up Mother’s Day? Oh my gosh, it was challenging. So, yeah, I think a new body of work is coming. The original piece I made was about your mom as your mirror, since your parents are the first ones to reflect your emotions and expressions to you as a baby. So I think I’m going to continue working with mirrors. Babies are fascinated by them. And I enjoy seeing my little girl look at them all the time.

Laura Thorne
That’s an interesting thought.

Emily Longbrake
I can send a quote from the book that I grabbed that idea from: it was not my idea. Someone else very smart came up with it!

Laura Thorne
Yeah, that would be great. I would like to ponder on that for a little bit whether I follow through with it, I don’t know. But I took ceramics: I was not good at it. That’s a medium I don’t tackle at all. Let’s see, one final question. What do you think is a suggestion orsomething you’ve been doing to bring fun or just brevity fun into this quarantine time? Like, what what do you suggest that other people could do?

Unknown Speaker
I found an old video game that I really liked. And I’m not a gaming person: my family plays cards so you can heckle each other in real life. We just can’t do that right now. I thought that a video game would feel like a total waste of time and I would have the studio guilt that I should be doing something productive. But just a couple minutes of playing a ridiculous video game that’s with your spouse or kids or whatever, has been really fun. Maybe if you already like gaming, switch it up. Going from analog to digital or vice versa would be how to mix up a little bit.

Laura Thorne
Well, that’s great. That’s almost that’s almost like a thing that people wouldn’t know about you.

Emily Longbrake
Yeah, the game I’m playing is Rayman: a good throwback!

Laura Thorne
Well, thank you. It was so great to learn a little bit more about you. And it’s cool that I’m here in Syracuse and you are in Alaska, and I’ll get to meet you next time I’m there.

Emily Longbrake
Sounds great: thank you so much!

 

 

Transcribed by otter.ai

Links from this interview